Exxelia acquires Deyoung MFG., INC.

Exxelia today announced that it has acquired Seattle area DeYoung Mfg., Inc. (aka DMI), a highly respected designer and manufacturer of high reliability electromagnetic products serving the North American aerospace, medical and industrial markets.


“The DMI acquisition directly supports our Magnetics SBU expansion strategy. DMI’s strategic location in the Pacific Northwest aerospace market provides a key geographic location for driving growth and profitability,” said François Vignaud, Exxelia Magnetics’ SBU VP. “DMI is highly regarded for the quality of its products and the operational performance of its organization. DMI products can be found on most major commercial aerospace platforms, supporting in flight power, lighting and entertainment sub-systems.”

“We welcome DMI into the Exxelia Group,” said Exxelia USA President Michael Thomas. “During its 40-plus years in business, DMI has built solid customer relationships with a strong brand reputation in the aerospace, medical and other high-reliability magnetics markets. Acquiring DMI creates the potential for both revenue and cost synergies related to cross selling and procurement savings as we leverage Exxelia Group’s broader global supply chain and operational excellence practices to support DMI’s operations.”

According to Martin DeYoung, President & CEO of DMI, “We are excited to now be a part of Exxelia’s growth and expanded product offerings. The DeYoung’s recognized a shared business culture driven by a passion for quality and customer loyalty. By joining Exxelia Group we achieve a goal of meeting our strategic growth objectives while protecting our long standing relationships with our key aerospace customers and their contract manufacturers.”

“This acquisition addresses our aerospace customers increasing requirements for global manufacturing access and timely support” stated Eric DeYoung, VP of Operations at DMI. “Together, we have global reach with the capability to serve our customers – whatever their size, location, or aerospace industry sector with one of the most comprehensive and competitive groups of design and manufacturing capabilities.”

Published on 02 May 2016 by Marion Van de Graaf

Exxelia Ohmcraft Custom Resistors Help Ensure Reliability of Most-Deployed Anti-Tank Missile in the World

In times of warfare, the reliability of military weapons is absolutely critical to the success of a mission. For nearly a decade, military contractors have leveraged Exxelia Ohmcraft’s custom, high voltage resistors and dividers to ensure product performance in a variety of military applications, including the FGM-148 Javelin—the most-deployed anti-tank missile in the world. In a variety of military applications, including the FGM-148 Javelin—the most-deployed anti-tank missile in the world.“Missiles are exposed to extreme climate conditions and often sit idle—sometimes for several years—before they are launched. When that time comes, it is essential for those missiles to perform as expected,” said Eric Van Wormer, Vice President of Exxelia Ohmcraft. “Exxelia Ohmcraft custom resistors are designed to support the rigorous precision and reliability specifications required by military suppliers to withstand the harsh environmental conditions, ensuring that the missile remains fully operational under all circumstances. Exxelia Ohmcraft performs a full range of military lot acceptance testing (LAT) on resistors as necessary, and works closely with military contractors to meet the design requirements for each particular application. In the case of the FGM-148 Javelin, a small, lightweight form factor was imperative to keep the missiles as lightweight and portable as possible. Exxelia Ohmcraft’s technology utilizes the proprietary Micropen electronic printing system to “print” precise, narrow, serpentine lines with resistive ink on a ceramic substrate, producing higher performance resistors over a wider range of values on a smaller surface area than is possible with conventional film resistor technology.

Exxelia onboard Solar Orbiter

Solar Orbiter, a European Space Agency mission, was launched on an Ariane V rocket from the Guiana Space Centre at Kourou in French Guiana on November 17, 2018. The satellite reached its first working orbit around the Sun, called “halo orbit” and is ready to begin its first scientific observation campaign. The campaign will last six months, during which time the 55 payloads will be turned on one by one and tested before being used to perform scientific observations. Solar Orbiter is a highly complex scientific laboratory. Deploying such a mission is a one-of-a-kind achievement! The mission will take years and is one of the most highly anticipated scientific experiments of our time. And you know what they say: your best work comes when you're up against the toughest challenges. Unfortunately, these challenges aren't only in labs, but also in space. To study the Sun and its activity like never before, scientists are sending a probe into orbit around it. Solar Orbiter will be facing temperatures of up to 500°C, which is usually not survivable for complex equipment. But do you know what's even more challenging than getting data from a 500°C hot solar environment? Getting that data with expensive equipment that doesn't work, because you don't have enough reliable components at your disposal! That's why we, at Exxelia, were so happy when we heard that thousands of our capacitors and magnetics were chosen by the European Space Agency to achieve this mission; we're talking about components that will keep working in those kinds of harsh environments! They will help scientists better understand energy flow and particle acceleration within our own solar system and beyond. Shockingly, the Sun is mostly a mystery. We have some understanding of its composition, but it's unclear how the phenomena we see happen. Solar Orbiter is going to help us get a better idea of what makes the Sun tick by taking some of the most detailed images and observations of our star ever taken. Solar Orbiter carry two instruments: a Wide-Angle Imager (WIA) and a Coronal Imager (CI). Each will provide high-resolution images—an order of magnitude higher than those captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory—and spectacular views of the Sun's polar regions. The WIA will capture images in five wavelengths, while the CI will use seven wavelengths to observe phenomena that affect the upper layers of the solar atmosphere, such as magnetic fields and plasma flows. Our capacitors and magnetics are critical for stabilizing and powering these instruments on their mission to explore our home star! They need to be able to perform in a very hostile environment with temperatures ranging from -150°C (-238°F) to 500°C (932°F). Temperatures will reach their highest during the closest flybys of the Sun—which will take place as close as 15 million kilometers (about 93 million miles) from its surface. Our space capacitors and magnetics are capable of withstanding such high temperatures. They'll even keep functioning in cryogenic conditions, as low as -150°C (-238°F). These components are also very durable, which makes them perfectly suited for this mission. Choosing the right capacitors for such a mission was not easy. The requirements and technical constraints were very strict. We had also to support and select the materials that could handle the launch vibrations and the shock of the rocket launching phase, we also had to achieve a very long life and high reliability in order to succeed in the mission. This project proves that our EXXELIA components are incredibly reliable and have nothing to envy to other electronic components on the market. Several other tests have been conducted by ESA in this project such as solar radiation, thermal shock...   Exxelia ESA QLP Products Onboard Solar Orbiter : 14,400 CNC chips ceramic capacitors 14,400 CEC chips ceramic capacitors 520 of our CNC stacks ceramic capacitors 470 SESI QPL Inductors 380 MSCI RF Inductors  287 ESA qualified CTC21/E Tantalum Capacitors 50 ESA Film Capacitors PM94